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Pinpoint the Positive, People!

If not opioids, then what, Doc?

Date: August 31, 2017 | Time: 6:34am | Posted By: Christopher Renne

That is the Million Dollar question for thousands of people who just want the pain to stop.

As promised in my last blog post, here in one doctor's opinion on the matter:

Dr. Robert H. Smerling, MD, Faculty Editor and a regular contributor to the Harvard Health Publication writes this in his recent entry Here's something completely different for back pain:

"A recent study found that NSAIDs did not work well for back pain. But, new recommendations take that conclusion even further: it may be best to avoid medications altogether - at least at the start.
The American College of Physicians has just come out with new guidelines for the treatment of low back pain based on a review of more than 150 studies. The big news? Medications tend to have only temporary and modest benefits, so it makes sense to try something other than a pill. The specifics depend on the type and duration of back pain.
For new low back pain (lasting less than 12 weeks), try:
  • heat
  • massage
  • acupuncture
  • spinal manipulation, as with chiropractic care.
If these don't work, NSAIDs or a muscle relaxant are reasonable options. But given their potential to cause side effects and their modest benefit, they aren't the first choice.
For chronic low back pain (lasting 12 weeks or more), try:
  • exercise (including stretching, improving balance, and strengthening core muscles)
  • physical therapy
  • acupuncture
  • mindfulness-based programs intended to cope with or reduce stress.
Other approaches, such as tai chi, yoga, or progressive relaxation techniques may also be helpful.
If these don't work, treatment with NSAIDs, tramadol, or duloxetine is worth consideration. However, opioids should be considered only if other measures have failed and only after a thorough review of potential benefits and risks with your doctor.
It's important to emphasize these suggestions are for low back pain that might begin after an unusually strenuous workout or shoveling snow. It's not for serious causes of back pain such as a major injury, cancer, infection, or fractures (see "red flag" symptoms below).

What if the pain continues?

If pain persists despite these non-medication and medication-based treatments, your doctor may want to consider additional tests (such as MRI) or treatments. Remember, each person's situation is a little different, and even medications that don't work well on average, may work well for you.

You could see this coming?

It's been known for years that the vast majority of low back pain goes away on its own, regardless of treatment. So, the challenge has been to find something that safely eases symptoms while waiting for improvement.

How do I know it's nothing serious?

You don't. But, you should be reassured that the numbers are with you. Ninety-nine percent or more of people with low back pain do not have a serious cause. But to help make sure your back isn't in that small sliver of dangerous causes, doctors use the "red flag" questions:
  • Have you ever been diagnosed with cancer?
  • Have you experienced unexplained or unintentional weight loss?
  • Do you have an abnormal immune system (due to disease or medications)?
  • Do you use intravenous drugs?
  • Have you had a fever recently?
  • Have you had significant injury to your back recently?
  • Have you had bladder or bowel incontinence?
These questions and a physical examination are intended to identify factors that would increase the chances that your back pain is due to infection, tumor, or other serious cause.

So, what?

These new guidelines endorse an approach to treating a common ailment that only a few years ago would have seemed outrageous. The remedies recommended are not brand new; but discouraging medication use as an initial step is a big departure from prior recommendations. An email alert I received just after these guidelines were published included the headline: "Take two yoga classes and call me next month?" It may not be such a bad idea!
Medical practice rarely changes right away, and these guidelines may have relatively little impact in the short run. But I would not be surprised if non-pharmacological treatment of back pain becomes the norm over time. Many of my patients already seek out these treatments regardless of whether I recommend them. After all, the "usual" medications for low back pain are not all that effective and often cause trouble. It's time we recognize that there are other, better ways to help."
So there you have it. Some viable and productive options for the treatment of mild to moderate acute onset back pain. I strongly believe in exhausting all conservative means of pain control prior to taking narcotic pain relievers that simply mask symptoms and potentially create issues greater than the pain itself.

Remember, as someone much more interesting than I one said "knowledge is power". So load up and take care of YOU.


Until next time, be well and PINPOINT THE POSITIVE!



doctorchristopherrenne













Christopher B. Renne, D.C.

4111 Atlantic Boulevard

Jacksonville, FL 32207


www.activechirocenter.com

904-398-4860 office

Please don't keep us a secret. Rate us on Yelp!
https://www.yelp.com/biz/active-medical-and-chiropractic-jacksonville



(1) https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/heres-something-completely-different-for-low-back-pain-2017070611962?utm_source=delivra&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=BF20170717-BackPain&utm_id=569043&dlv-ga-memberid=11155152&mid=11155152&ml=569043 <view entire article>





Why should I care about this so called "opioid crisis" Dr. Chris?

Date: August 15, 2017 | Time: 7:29am | Posted By: Christopher Renne

Hello again, friends. Recall, last week we defined what and opioid/narcotic medication was.
Today, I'd like to expand on why YOU should care in the first place.

"Calls have come from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) for a shift away from opioid use toward non-pharmacologic approaches to address chronic pain.

Overdose deaths involving prescription opioids have quadrupled since 1999, as have sales of these prescription drugs. From 1999 to 2014, more than 165,000 people --- three times the U.S. military deaths during the twenty years of the Vietnam War -- have died in the U.S. from overdoses related to prescription opioids. Today, at least half of all U.S. opioid overdose deaths involve a prescribed opioid. In 2014, more than 14,000 people died from overdoses involving these drugs, with the most commonly overdosed opioids -- Methadone, Oxycodone (such as OxyContin(R)), and Hydrocodone (such as Vicodin(R)) -- resulting in death.

Regrettably, overdose deaths resulting from opioid abuse have risen sharply in every county of every state across the country, reaching a new peak in 2014: 28,647 people, or 78 people per day - more than three people per hour. The newest estimates on the cost of opioid abuse to U.S. employers is estimated at $18 billion in sick days, lost productivity and medical expenses. An important non-pharmacologic approach in helping to solve this crisis is chiropractic care.(my specialty). This discussion offers greater understanding of the scope of the opioid situation, the elements that have contributed to it and an approach that emphasizes non-pharmacologic care. Collectively, we must begin to extricate ourselves from our current ineffective, dangerous and often fatal reality. "

I hope this information finds a place in your consciousness and will help you make wise, informed descisions about the type of care you chose when injured or hurting. I also hope this sparks a hunger to learn more about some of the alternatives to controlled substances that exist in the medical community.

Stay tuned, more to follow....

As always, I am grateful for your thoughtful attention. Please share this with the people you love. Together, I sincerely believe we all can make a difference. And we CAN bring those shocking numbers down. Every life is precious. So take care of yours!



Yours in health,

Jacksonville, Florida Whiplash Specialist
















Christopher B. Renne, D.C.

4111 Atlantic Boulevard

Jacksonville, FL 32207

904-398-4860
www.activechirocenter.com


Please don't keep us a secret. Rate us on Yelp!

https://www.yelp.com/biz/active-medical-and-chiropractic-jacksonville <view entire article>





What exactly is an Opioid and why should I care, Doc?

Date: August 10, 2017 | Time: 6:12am | Posted By: Christopher Renne

Thank you for taking the time to read part 2 in my ongoing series highlighting the growing dangers of prescription and non prescription Opiod (narcotic) medications. Here is a recent description provided by the American Society of Addiction Medicine:

"Opioids are a class of drugs that include the illicit drug heroin as well as the licit (legal) prescription painrelievers, oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, morphine, fentanyl and others. Opioids are chemically related and interact with opioid receptors on nerve cells in the brain and nervous system to produce pleasurable effects and relieve pain. Addiction is a primary, chronic and relapsing brain disease characterized by an individual pathologically pursuing reward and/or relief by substance use and other behaviors. Of the 21.5 million Americans age 12 or older that had a substance use disorder in 2014, 1.9 million had a substance abuse disorder involving prescription pain relievers and 586,000 had a substance abuse disorder involving heroin. It is estimated that 23 percent of individuals who use heroin develop opioid addiction."

I think now is a good time to provide an important disclaimer. My office is proud to feature both medical and chiropractic solutions to pain related syndromes. We have no axe to grind against allopathic (1) medicine and we are proud to work with traditional medical providers to find the very best solutions for our patients. Many times, these treatment plans include prescription medications.
The overall purpose of this series is to provide education to the public regarding what is happening and future posts will provide alternatives for consideration that do not include potentially dangerous opioid medications. As a father of three growing boys that like to hurt themselves, this series is very personal to me as I have seen first hand what irresponsible dispensing of these potentially harmful drugs can do.

So please read, absorb and empower yourself to make safe choices for you and those you love.

As always, Pinpoint the Positive and be well!

Yours in health,

doctorchristopherrenne













Christopher B. Renne, D.C.

4111 Atlantic Boulevard

Jacksonville, FL 32207


www.activechirocenter.com

904-398-4860 office

Please don't keep us a secret. Rate us on Yelp!
https://www.yelp.com/biz/active-medical-and-chiropractic-jacksonville



(1) Allopathic: a system of medical practice that aims to combat disease by use of remedies (as drugs or surgery) producing effects different from or incompatible with those produced by the disease being treated-compare homeopathy. <view entire article>





Emergency! Please read and share

Date: August 8, 2017 | Time: 12:20pm | Posted By: Christopher Renne

Tallahassee, Fl - In an unprecedented action, Governor Scott, Wednesday declared an opioid epidemic threatening the State of Florida with an emergency. In his Executive Order No. 17-146, Governor Scott recognized the 33,000 nationwide deaths per year and 3,900 Florida deaths due to opioids.

The Order allows for federal grant funds to provide for services to Florida communities instead of waiting until the start of the next fiscal year, July 1, 2017. The HHS grant of $27M over two years, provides funds to the Department of Children and Families, to provide prevention, treatment, and recovery support services to address this epidemic.

The Order also directs DCF, DOH, and FDLE to meet with communities and hold workshops to identify additional strategies to fight the rising opioid usage cases in Florida. (1)


Thank you for reading and sharing this. There will be more to follow on the very hot topic. Stay tuned and stay well!

Respectfully yours,

doctorchristopherrenne















Christopher B. Renne, D.C.

4111 Atlantic Boulevard

Jacksonville, FL 32207


www.activechirocenter.com

904-398-4860 office

Please don't keep us a secret. Rate us on Yelp!
https://www.yelp.com/biz/active-medical-and-chiropractic-jacksonville



(1) Source: Paul Lambert, J.D. Florida Chiropractic Association General Council
<view entire article>





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